Projects/Activities

The full list of projects contains the entire database hosted on this portal, across the available directories. The projects and activities (across all directories/catalogs) are also available by country of origin, by geographical region, or by directory.

Displaying: 81 - 100 of 269 Next
81. Directorate of Health - Centre for Health Security and Communicable Disease Control - Embætti landlæknis – sóttvarnalæknir

The Centre for Health Security and Communicable Disease Control at the Directorate of Health is operated according to the Act on Health Security and Communicable Diseases, No. 19/1997 (http://eng.velferdarraduneyti.is/media/Reglugerdir-enska/Act_on_Communicable_Diseases_2007.pdf). This act applies to diseases and agents that can cause epidemics and other serious infectious diseases or pose a threat to public welfare. “Diseases” means disease or infection caused by infectious material, microbes and their toxins or parasites as well as serious health consequences caused by toxic chemicals and radio nuclear materials. The act also applies to unusual and unexpected events which may cause severe health consequences of international concern. The Chief Epidemiologist (CE) is responsible for maintaining a register of communicable diseases, including agents causing diseases and health threat events, immunisations and the use of antimicrobial drugs. These registers are intended to be of use in preventive measures and in epidemiological research. The CE chairs an inter-organisational committee on response measures if there is a risk that animals, food, water, sewers, ventilation or anything else in the environment is spreading or could spread infectious sources of disease, toxic chemicals or radio-nuclear agents that threaten the health of humans. The Minister decides, on the advice of the CE, whether official measures should be implemented, such as immunisation, isolation of infected persons, disinfections, quarantining of communities or the whole country, closing of schools or prohibition of public gatherings. The CE may apply such emergency measures without seeking authority in advance, if he believes that any delay would entail a risk, but he must inform the Minister of his actions immediately Network type: - Thematic observations - Health care observations - Community based observations - Epidemic intelligence

Human health
82. Hydrological observation network for land water bodies

Monitoring of the state of land water bodies and river estuaries Network type: Data on the network for land water bodies and river estuaries covers the region of the Russian Arctic limited with its water resource boundaries close to the AMAP boundaries. Within these boundaries, when the network extension was the greatest in the 1980s, there were 288 points including 199 basic ones (97 of which are reference ones) and 89 auxiliary and departmental ones. Actually in the Russian Arctic, there are 182 points including 137 basic ones (88 of which are reference ones) and 52 auxiliary and departmental ones and 12 of which function under special estuarine programs

83. Monitoring of contaminants in atmosphere and biota in Greenland

Temporal trend monitoring of contaminants in atmosphere and biota in Greenland. Modelling the atmospheric transport pathways and deposition of contaminants in the Arctic as well as determination of climate related parameters.

Atmosphere Ecosystems
84. Landgræðsla Ríkisins ‐ The Soil Conservation Service of Iceland, SCS (SCS)

The main tasks of the SCSI include combating desertification, sand encroachment and other soil erosion, promotion of sustainable land use and reclamation and restoration of degraded land. The work is on different levels, from policy making and research, to extension services and management of large‐ and small‐scale reclamation projects. The total area of reclamation sites is about 4460 km2. The SCSI operates several district offices around Iceland with headquarters at Gunnarsholt in South Iceland. The total number of permanent staff is about 60. Over 600 farmers participate in reclamation activities in cooperation with the SCSI. These sites are monitored annually with site visits by SCSI staff. • The SCSI monitors vegetation dynamics, carbon sequestration in soils and vegetation in all land reclamation sites active since 1990 as a part of Iceland's commitment to the Kyoto emission imitation commitment. Over 500 plots are monitored since 2007 or about 100 annually, hence revisited every five years. • The SCSI also monitors streambank erosion. • The SCSI in collaboration with the University of Iceland, institutes and individuals around Iceland monitor phenology of selected plant species for determining long term impact of climate change on plants. The project started in 2010 with monitoring sites located in diverse conditions. Main gaps: Not specified Network type: ‐ Thematic observations ‐ Field stations ‐ Permanent monitoring plots

Ecosystems
85. Soft Bottom Fauna time series (BIODAFF) (BIODAFF)

EMBOS is a continuation of BIOMARE and aims for integrating marine biological – biodiversity observations Long Term Large Scale in set of selected stations across Europe. Poland (IOPAS) is responsible for the Hornsund site and together with Norway (Norsk Polarinstitutt, UNIS, AKVAPLAN) IOPAS is responsible for the Kongsfjorden site. Main gaps: Sediment chemistry

Ecosystems
86. Network of coastal observation of Arctic seas level

Monitoring and study of fluctuation of Arctic seas level

Oceanography
87. Värriö sub-arctic research station of University of Oulu and University of Helsinki (Värriö)

SMEAR I –station (Station for Measuring Ecosystem – Atmosphere Relations) was built in 1991-1992 at the side of Värriö Subarctic Research Station to monitor the pollution originating from Kola Peninsula. Continuous measurements of trace gases, aerosols, photosynthesis growth of Scots pines and meteorology have been carried on by the University of Helsinki since 1992. The station is located at the northern border of Salla municipality, some 6 km’s from the Russian border and built on top of a 390 m high forested hill. A 16 meter high weather mast is mounted next to the measurement cabin. The closest source area for air pollutants are the mining and metallurgical industry at the Kola Peninsula with the most important point sources being Nikel, Montcegorsk and Zapolyarny, respectively. In addition to the measurements carried on by the University of Helsinki, Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has been measuring both sulphates and heavy metals using filter sampling techniques. Also, respiration and photosynthesis of the soil has been measured campaign wise in the vicinity of the station. Trace gases have been measured at four different levels (2, 6.5, 9 and 15 m) above the ground until recently the three highest sampling levels were taken off. The sulphur dioxide concentration is measured with a pulsed fluorescence analyzer. Nitrogen oxides (most importantly NO and NO2) are measured with an analyzer that is based on chemiluminescence and ozone is measured with a photometric analyzer. Total aerosol concentration has been measured since 1991 and the particle size distribution since 1997. The cut-off diameter of the size distribution measurements was changed from 8 nm to 3 nm in 2003. The total concentration is measured using CPC (Condensation Particle Counter) and the size distribution with DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) system. Photosynthesis of Scots pines is measured from living twigs using chambers placed on top of the trees. Also, the growth in width and length are measured. A wide range of meteorological parameters are measured at five different levels (2, 4, 6.6, 9, 15 ja 16 m). Network type: Automatic and manual monitoring of atmosphere and biosphere (incl. SMEAR I –station and synoptic weather observations) as well as tracking and monitoring wide range of flora and fauna (e.g. game, insects and berries).

Atmosphere Ecosystems
88. Network of terrestrial meteorological observations

Monitoring and forecast of the atmosphere state and climate change. Main gaps: Initial historical data from specific stations have not been digitized It is needed to control and recover gaps in historical data from specific stations.

Atmosphere
89. Human Health National Social-hygienic monitoring system

To establish and maintain the state-owned national system of monitoring, analysis, assessment and support of decision making in the area of environmental and public health with focus on management of health risk factors such as environmental pollution, infections, food and water quality etc. The system has been enforced by the federal governmental Decree Feb. 2. 2006 # 60. It comprises all administrative units (republics, oblasts (counties), autonomous okrugs, cities and some municipalities of Russian Federation including those located in the arctic region. Main gaps: The health and demographic data link exclusively to administrative provinces of Russia which are not always applicable to geographical and climatic regions such as arctic. Network type: Service of Protection Consumers’ Right and Human Wellbeing, Federal Service of Hydrometeorology, laboratories accredited for contaminant measurements, regional/city administration health committees, hospitals Regional and City based observations

Human health
90. Monitoring component of solar radiation in the Arctic

The World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) was established by the order of WMO in the Voeikov Main Geophysical Observatory (Saint Petersburg) in 1964 to centrally collect and provide solar radiation data from the world actinometric network stations. Main gaps: Actually the acquisition of data from some Arctic stations, including Russian ones, is paused due to reconstruction of national actinometric networks. The network included in the international data exchange is sparse. Network type: • Collection of actinometric data from National Meteorological Administrations and other organizations • Processing and control of operational information • Scientific and methodological interaction with NHMS’ • Publication and distribution of bulletins “Solar Radiation and Radiation Balance. World Network”, including data access through the WRDC server http://wrdc.mgo.rssi.ru • Service of users of information on solar radiation • Analysis of historical data • Creation of metadata base

91. Aerological observation network

Monitoring and forecast of the atmosphere state and climate change. Main gaps: Initial historical data before 1961 from specific stations have not been digitized. A part of metadata have not been digitized

Atmosphere
92. Flugstoðir ‐ ISAVIA (ISAVIA)

Isavia is the national operator of Iceland‘s airports, air navigation services and air communications system. Iceland is responsible for international services in the North Atlantic including oceanic air traffic control services and the upper airspace of Greenland. The company and its subsidiaries have undertaken other international support tasks in the past, such as the development of Pristina Airport and ATM services in Kosovo. The company conducts air navigation calibrations in Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Isavia operates under the regulatory supervision of the Icelandic and Danish Civil Aviation Authorities. Isavia and its subsidiaries conduct research and development of systems to fulfill all the special needs and safety requirements of the airports and air navigation service operation, with economic considerations in mind. Most of the software systems used by the air traffic control center in Reykjavik and towers are developed in conjunction with the subsidiary company, Tern Systems ltd. The products have been successfully marketed internationally in several overseas projects. For more detailed information, please see Isavia annual report 2010. Main gaps: Not specified Network type: Coordination

Atmosphere
93. Oceanological observations in the Arctic Ocean

Monitoring and study of hydrophysical and hydrochemical parameters of the Arctic Ocean

Oceanography
94. Network of voluntary marine meteorological observations

Incidental hydrometeorological observations along vessel routes. Monitoring and forecast of the surface layer atmosphere state, hydrometeorological support of safety of navigation and marine activities.

Climate
95. Network of hydrological stations located on rivers and channels

Monitoring and forecast of the state of water streams and hydrological hazards, assessment of water resources. Main gaps: Initial data before 1984 have not been digitized.

96. Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI)

DMI operates general weather observation for meteorological and climatological services. DMI operates geomagnetic observatories in Greenland DMI monitores stratospheric ozone and UV radiation DMI operatetes ocean monitoring and operational icecharting

Oceanography Atmosphere Ecosystems
97. Umhverfisstofnun ‐ The Environment Agency of Iceland (Umhverfisstofnun)

The Environment Agency operates under the direction of the Ministry for the Environment. It's role is to promote the protection as well as sustainable use of Iceland’s natural resources, as well as public welfare by helping to ensure a healthy environment, and safe consumer goods. Areas of operation: 1. Information and advice for the public, businesses and regulatory authorities 2. Monitoring of environmental quality 3. Evaluation of environmental impact assessment and development plans 4. Operation supervision, inspection, operating permits, etc. 5. Assessment of conservation effects and registration of unique nature 6. Management and supervision of designated protected areas 7. Wildlife management and conservation 8. Eco‐labeling 9. Labeling and handling of toxic as well as other hazardous substances 10. Coordination of health and safety in public places 11. Coordination of local environmental and health inspectorates 12. Genetically modified organisms (GMO) Main gaps: Metadata archives and metadata availability Network type: ‐ Thematic observations ‐ Community based observations ‐ Coordination

Geology Oceanography Atmosphere Ecosystems
98. POLAR-AOD and the Arctic Oceanographic Observations (AREX)

The Arctic region represents a sensitive ecosystem, which is susceptible to even small changes in the local climate. Special conditions of usually high surface albedo and low solar elevations cause enhanced aerosol/cloud effects due to multiple scattering. It is suspected that this increased interaction between solar radiation and the aerosol particles/clouds magnifies their radiative impact. Thus, for a given aerosol distribution, the specific optical properties are enhanced in the polar regions. For the same reasons, results from field experiments at low latitudes are difficult to transfer to polar regions and as a consequence there is an urgent need to conduct specific measurement programs in high latitude regions. In order to improve the knowledge about the origin, transport pathways, vertical structure of aerosol physical and chemical properties as well as the impact on climate in the polar regions, a combined effort of surface-based, airborne and spaceborne measurements is needed. Therefore, this proposed project is aiming at a determination of the vertical structure of the chemical, physical and optical properties of Arctic aerosol particles, including solar radiative closure between observed and calculated aerosol properties (direct climate effect)

Climate
99. Arctic Oceanographic Observations (AREX) (AREX)

Since 1988 the regular summer hydrographic observations in the Nordic Seas and Fram Strait have been collected by the Institute of Oceanology Polish Academy of Sciences (IOPAS). Observational activities were carried out under several national programs, in the frames of EU projects VEINS, ASOF-N and DAMOCLES and within Polish-Norwegian cooperation in the AWAKE project. The main objectives are:  to study the long-term variability of water mass distribution, their physical and chemical properties and different pathways in the Nordic Seas;  to investigate the Atlantic water (AW) circulation in the Nordic Seas and its inflow into the Arctic Ocean;  to recognize the possible feedbacks between the Atlantic water variability and local and global climate changes.

Hydrography Oceanography
100. Centre d'études nordiques (CEN) Observing Program (CEN)

The Centre for Northern Studies (www.cen.ulaval.ca; CEN: Centre d’études nordiques) is an interuniversity centre of excellence for research involving Université Laval, Université du Québec à Rimouski and the Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement de l'Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS). Members also come from the following affiliations: Université de Montréal, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, à Montréal and à Trois-Rivières, Université de Sherbrooke, and the College François-Xavier Garneau. The CEN is multidisciplinary, bringing together over forty researchers including biologists, geographers, geologists, engineers, archaeologists, and landscape management specialists. The CEN community also counts two hundred graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and employees. CEN’s mission is to contribute to the sustainable development of northern regions by way of an improved understanding of environmental change. CEN researchers analyze the evolution of northern environments in the context of climate warming and accelerated socio-economic change and train highly qualified personnel in the analysis and management of cold region ecosystems and geosystems. In partnership with government, industry and northern communities, CEN plays a pivotal role in environmental stewardship and development of the circumpolar North. CEN research activities are focused on three themes: 1 -Structure and function of northern continental environments. 2 -Evolution of northern environments in the context of global change. 3-Evaluation of the risks associated with environmental change and development of adaptation strategies. In 2009, CEN organised an international workshop with the European SAON network SCANNET and also partners throughout Canada. The workshop culminated in the formal incorporation of CEN stations within SCANNET (http://www.scannet.nu/). Main gaps: [Not specified] Network type: CEN operates the CEN Network, an extensive network of meteorological and field stations that were established in consultation with northern communities. The CEN Network comprises over 75 climate and soil monitoring stations and eight field stations distributed across a 4000 km North-South gradient from boreal forest to the High Arctic. The eight field stations are situated at the following sites: Radisson, Whapmagoostui- Kuujjuarapik, Umiujaq, Lac à l’Eau Claire (in the proposed new park Tursujuq), Boniface River, Salluit, and Bylot and Ward Hunt Islands, which are part of two National Parks in Nunavut. The main field station at the heart of the CEN Network is at Whapmagoostui-Kuujjuarapik.

Oceanography Atmosphere Ecosystems