Projects/Activities

The full list of projects contains the entire database hosted on this portal, across the available directories. The projects and activities (across all directories/catalogs) are also available by country of origin, by geographical region, or by directory.

Displaying: 41 - 60 of 196 Next
41. NOAA + NASA remote sensing of climate variables (NOAA + NASA remote sensing)

Both NOAA and NASA operate satellites with cover¬age of the Arctic region. The major observations and products are: 1. Daily, near real-time plots of surface, cloud, and radiative properties from AVHRR; 2. Near real-time MODIS and AVHRR polar winds; 3. Daily, near real-time plots of clear sky, low-level temperature inversions from MODIS; 4. Daily profile plots of Arctic temperature, humid-ity and winds; 5. Near-daily plots of surface winds over open water; and 6. Surface temperatures for land, sea and sea ice.

Climate Sea ice Atmosphere
42. NWS Arctic activities

More information about NWS observing activities will be available in due course Alaska Region Headquarters, http://www.arh.noaa.gov/ Weather station list and real-time observations, http://www.arh.noaa.gov/obs.php Marine observations, http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/maps/Alaska.shtml Hydrology – Alaska Pacific River Forecast Center, http://aprfc.arh.noaa.gov/

Climate Atmosphere
43. NOAA Arctic Atmospheric Observatories

More information about the following long-term observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
44. Atmospheric Baseline Observatories – Barrow, Alaska

More information about the following long-term observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
45. Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS)

To develop a coastal and ocean observing system in the Alaska region that meets the needs of multiple stakeholders by (1) serving as a regional data center providing data integration and coordination; (2) identifying stakeholder and user priorities for ocean and coastal information; (4) working with federal, state and academic partners to fill those gaps, including by AOOS where appropriate. Main gaps: AOOS and the data center are statewide activities, but thus far, available funding has limited observations and models primarily the Gulf of Alaska.

Climate Oceanography Atmosphere Human health Ecosystems
46. Automated Surface Observing System - Alaska (ASOS)

More information about the following aviation meteorology observing activities will be available in due course

Climate Atmosphere
47. Beaufort and Chukchi Seas Mesoscale Meteorology Model

1. Produce a geospatial surface meteorological database for the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas and the adjacent coastal areas by collecting available conventional and unconventional surface and atmospheric data and conducting field work; 2. Establish a well-tuned Beaufort/Chukchi seas mesoscale meteorology model through further modeling studies for the optimization and improvement of the model physics and configuration; 3. Conduct a long-term hindcast simulation with the optimized data-modeling system and produce a high resolution meteorological dataset for the Beaufort and Chukchi regions; and 4. Document the high-resolution climatological features of the Beaufort/Chukchi seas’ surface winds, including an analysis of the interannual variability and long-term

Atmosphere
48. NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program, Alaska Region

To determine status and trend in the condition of selected natural resources in national park units in Alaska. There are four networks, each encompassing activities in a set of national parks, preserves and other park lands: • Arctic Network (ARCN): Gates of the Arctic, Noatak, Kobuk Valley, Cape Krusenstern, Bering Land Bridge. • Central Alaska Network (CAKN): Yukon-Charley Rivers, Denali, Wrangell-St. Elias. • Southwest Alaska Network (SWAN): Kenai Fjords, Lake Clark, Katmai, Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak. • Southeast Alaska Network (SEAN): Glacier Bay, Klondike Gold Rush, Sitka. Main gaps: Not all data are currently available but we are working toward that goal. Funding limitations do not allow monitoring at detailed levels.

Atmosphere Ecosystems
49. Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge (Kanuti NWR) (Kanuti NWR)

1) Annual monitoring of molting Greater White-fronted Geese (Interior refuges) 2) Waterfowl (primarily) breeding pair survey (MBM- done 1997, 2008-09) 3) Breeding Bird Survey (2 routes; annual, though not in 2009) 4) Alaska Landbird Monitoring Survey (2 plots; biennial) 5) Refuge moose population survey (annual) 6) Refuge wolf survey (annual as conditions allow; minimum census) 7) Henshaw Creek fish weir (annual; TCC = operator) 8) Stream gages (operational Oct 2009; will operate at least 6 years) 9) Snow markers (6 on refuge; checked monthly in winter; statewide??)

Climate Human health Ecosystems
50. Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge

To inventory and monitor resources of the Yukon Flats Basin to achieve refuge purposes.

Climate Human health Ecosystems
51. Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) (RAWS)

Support wildland fire management and protect life and property through the accurate measurement, recording and distribution of fire weather environmental data.

52. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) (ACRF)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) is a multi-platform national scientific user facility, with instruments at fixed and varying locations around the globe for obtaining continuous field measurements of climate data. Each ACRF site uses a leading edge array of cloud- and aerosol-observing instruments to record long-term continuous atmospheric and surface properties that affect cloud formation and radiation transport through the atmosphere. The ARCF also provides shorter-term (months rather than years) measurements with its two mobile facilities (AMFs) and its aerial measurements. Network type: - Atmosphere, with a focus on the impact of clouds and aerosol on the Earth’s radiation budget. - Location: Primary site: Barrow, Alaska, 71° 19' 23.73" N, 156° 36' 56.70" W Secondary site: Atqasuk, Alaska, 70° 28' 19.11" N, 157° 24' 28.99" W - Community-based: No.

Climate Atmosphere
53. Denmark Global Terrestrial Network for Lakes (GTN-L)

As with several other data types, lake level data are recorded by both local authorities as well as at national level. NERI is operating a database, from which data from lakes may be available upon request.

Climate
54. Denmark terrestrial hydrology

The GTN-H is a joint effort of the World Meteorological Organization / Climate and Water Department (WMO/CLW), the GCOS, and the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS12), co-sponsored by WMO, UNESCO, ICSU, UNEP and FAO. GTN-H represents the observational arm of the Group on Earth Observations / Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations Theme (GEO/IGWCO). The following hydrological variables have been identified as essential for the GTN-H13 network: Precipitation, river discharge, groundwater, water vapour, lake level/ area, isotopic composition, soil moisture, water use, snow cover, glaciers and ice caps, evapotranspiration, water quality/ biogeochemical fluxes. For most of the variables a global network is defined and a contact established. The Global Precipitation Climate Centre (GPCC) based at German Meteorological Institute/Deutsche Wetterdienst (DWD) and operating under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), as well as Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC), based at the Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde (Federal Institute of Hydrology, BfG) in Koblenz, Germany, and operating under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), are both parts of the GTN-H Panel and represent their respective networks on precipitation and river discharge. DMI contributes to GPCC with precipitation data, and NERI is reporting to GRDC under GTN-R (see paragraph 4.3).

Climate
55. Denmark Global Terrestrial Network for River Discharge

NERI is reporting to the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC), based at the Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde (Federal Institute of Hydrology, BfG) in Koblenz, Germany, and operating under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). GTN-R is a GRDC contribution to the Implementation Plan for the Global Observing System for Climate and to GTN-H. Denmark is reporting 14 stations as shown in Table 5

Climate Oceanography
56. Denmark hydrographic and marine surveys

The National Environmental Research Institute has the overall responsibility for surveillance of the Danish waters. Surveillance of fjords and coastal waters is carried our by the regional authorities, while NERI is responsible for mapping the open waters. All of the surveys are part of the Danish nationwide monitoring programme NOVANA All marine NOVANA data (regional and state) are collected annually in the national marine database, MADS, by NERI. For further reading and data see http://mads.dmu.dk . The Danish Institute for Fisheries Research carries out yearly surveys in Danish waters, primarily in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. Relevant oceanographic parameters are measured and recorded for these areas. Furthermore, DMI is involved in the following projects: • Measurements of water transports across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge • Monitoring of the oceanographic conditions along West Greenland • Monitoring of the oceanographic conditions around the Faroe Islands.

Climate Oceanography
57. Denmark Satellite observations as base for atmosphere related ECV observations

Upper-air temperature Homogenized upper-air temperature analyses: extended MSU-equivalent temperature record, new record for upper-troposphere and lower-stratosphere temperature using data from radio occultation, temperature analyses obtained from reanalyses. Water vapour Total column water vapour over the ocean and over land, tropospheric and lower stratospheric profiles of water vapour. Ozone Profiles and total column of ozone.

Climate Sea ice Oceanography Atmosphere
58. Denmark Automated Shipboard Aerological Programme (ASAP)

The ASAP in its present form began in the mid1980s. The programme objective is to record profile data from the upper air strata in ocean areas using automated sounding systems carried on board merchant ships plying regular ocean routes. Several national meteorological services operate ASAP units and the collected data are made available in real time via GTS. ASAP data are archived alongside other radio sounding data by many national meteorological services. ASAP is an important contribution to both the WWW and GCOS. Today most of the soundings are from the North Atlantic and north-west Pacific, but the programme is expanding to other ocean basins through a new, co-operative World-wide Recurring ASAP Project (WRAP). Denmark operates two ASAP units mounted on ships plying fixed routes from Denmark to Greenland. The European meteorological cooperation EUMETNET started a special E-ASAP programme in December 2000. The programme aims at joint operation of the ASAP programmes under the European meteorological institutes.

Climate Oceanography
59. Denmark upper air strata measurements radio sounding observations

DMI runs radio sounding stations at the following six locations: Tórshavn (the Faroe Islands), Danmarkshavn, Illoqqortoormiit, Tasiilaq, Narsarsuaq and Aasiaat (Greenland). Two soundings are made every day at these stations. A monthly summary (CLIMAT TEMP) from all stations is prepared and transmitted routinely on the GTS.

Climate Atmosphere
60. Denmark precipitation observation networks (stations and radar)

For national purposes, more data concerning precipitation is needed than can be provided from the overall surface climatological and meteorological network described above. In Denmark the precipitation observation network consists of approximately 350 stations. Roughly 100 of these provide data on precipitation intensity on an ongoing basis. They are jointly operated by DMI and The Water Pollution Committee of the Society of Danish Engineers (Spildevandskomitéen - SVK). The remaining 250 stations collect daily values of precipitation, and data from these are electronically transmitted to DMI on a daily basis. On the Faroe Islands a network of 7 precipitation station observe daily precipitation. Information on precipitation can also be obtained from weather radar data. In Denmark, DMI runs a network of four weather radars which provides 100% coverage of Danish land areas and coastal marine areas. The network s geographical coverage is unsurpassed, and hence provides detailed information about precipitation on national and local scales. By calibrating radar data against point measurements of precipitation the latest scientific results show a high absolute accuracy.

Climate