ENVINET Activities Catalog

ENVINET Activities Catalog

ENVINET (European network for arctic-alpine multidiciplanary environmental research) is a research infrastructure network focusing on multidisciplinary environmental research in Europe. The network involves representatives from 18 environmental research infrastructures from the European Alps to the Arctic, representatives of their users and representatives from relevant international organizations and networks. The participating infrastructures cover a broad range of environmental sciences primarily within atmospheric physics and chemistry as well as marine and terrestrial biology.

The ENVINET project directory covers data and observation activities at these stations.

Other catalogs through this service are AMAP, SAON and SEARCH, or refer to the full list of projects/activities.

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Displaying: 121 - 140 of 383 Next
121. Relation of photosynthesis and respiration in macroalgae

To be completed.

Biology
122. Cell lineage and gene expresion patterns during embryonic and larval development of the northern krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica

To be completed

Biology
123. Dietary effects on Biomarker Composition in Calanaus finmarchicus

To be completed

Biology
124. Endogenous swimming rythms in shore crab zoea from a low.tidal area

To be completed

Biology
125. Parasites and sexual selection in sand gobies: a field study

To be completed.

Biology
126. Life cycle strategies linked to adult development and reproduction in the Northern Krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica

To be completed.

Biology
127. Metabolic Adaptation and Swarm Dynamics in the Northern Krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica

To be completed.

Biology
128. Feeding and locomotion in Brissopsis lyrifera

To be completed.

Biology
129. EARLINET: A European Aerosol Research Lidar Network to Establish an Aerosol Climatology

EARLINET will establish a quantitative comprehensive statistical database of the horizontal, vertical, and temporal distribution of aerosols on a continental scale. The goal is to provide aerosol data with unbiased sampling, for important selected processes, and air-mass history, together with comprehensive analyses of these data. The objectives will be reached by implementing a network of 21 stations distributed over most of Europe, using advanced quantitative laser remote sensing to directly measure the vertical distribution of aerosols, supported by a suite of more conventional observations. Special care will be taken to assure data quality, including intercomparisons at instrument and evaluation levels. A major part of the measurements will be performed according to a fixed schedule to provide an unbiased statistically significant data set. Additional measurements will be performed to specifically address important processes that are localised either in space or time. Back-trajectories derived from operational weather prediction models will be used to characterise the history of the observed air parcels, accounting explicitly for the vertical distribution.

Atmospheric processes Climate variability Spatial trends Climate change Data management Atmosphere Temporal trends
130. Male mate choice and female sexual ornamentation in fish: experiments with two-spotted gobies

T be completed.

Biology
131. Male mate choice and female arnamentation in two-spotted gobies

To be completed.

Biology
132. Energetics of copepods in non-steady state food conditions

To be completed.

Biology
133. Macro-evolutionary Issues in Aplacophoran Development

To be completed.

Biology
134. Feeding behaviour of juvenile cod in shallow bays within Gullmar Fjord

To be completed.

Biology
135. SOGE: System for Observation of halogenated Greenhouse gases in Europe

SOGE is an integrated system for observation of halogenated greenhouse gases in Europe. There are two objectives: (1) To develop a new cost-effective long-term European observation system for halocarbons. The results will be in support of the Kyoto and the Montreal protocols,in assessing the compliance of European regions with the protocol requirements. In particular the observation system will be set up to: - detect trends in the concentrations of greenhouse active and ozone-destroying halocarbons; - verify reported emissions and validate emission inventories; - develop observational capacity for all halocarbons included in the Kyoto protocol (PFC, SF6) for which this is presently not yet existing; - develop a strategy for a cost-effective long-term observation system for halocarbons in Europe. (2) To predict and assess impacts of the halocarbons on the climate and on the ozone layer. This implies extensive exploitation of existing data. The impact assessment will be aimed at providing guidance for development of the Kyoto protocol and to the further development of the Montreal protocol mendments, by: - modelling impacts of halocarbons on radiative forcing and their relative importance for climate change; - modelling impacts of emissions of CFCs and HCFCs on the ozone layer.

Atmospheric processes Sources Ozone Climate variability Spatial trends Pollution sources Climate change Modelling Emissions Atmosphere Temporal trends
136. QUILT: Quantification and Interpretation of Long-Term UV-Vis Observations of the Stratosphere

The aim of QUILT is to optimise the exploitation of the existing European UV-visible monitoring systems by which O3 and the related free radicals NO2, BrO and OClO can be measured. These monitoring systems include ground-based, balloon and satellite observations. QUILT is providing an assessment of the chemical ozone loss over the last decade and through 2000-2003. This is achieved through analysis improvements, consolidation of existing datasets and near real time integrations with chemical transport models.

Atmospheric processes Sources Ozone Stratospheric Ozone Montreal Protocol Climate variability Spatial trends Pollution sources UV-Visible Remote Sensing Climate change Modelling Emissions Atmosphere Temporal trends Satellite Validation
137. FREETEX (part of TROTREP): The Free troposphere experiment

The goals of this experiment are to map out the chemical changes in the free troposphere as the atmosphere transitions from winter to spring. It is hoped to begin to understand the chemical conditions that influence the lifetime of ozone and understand more about the productivity of this region of the atmosphere with respect to the in-situ production of ozone. How the free troposphere responds to changing levels of pollution could be critical to the development of future abatement strategies.

Atmospheric processes Sources Ozone Mapping Climate variability Pollution sources Climate change Emissions Atmosphere
138. Deep-burrowing crustaceans – density dependent effects on sediment chemistry, Combined effect of sediment-associated compounds on marine benthic macrofauna, Effects of chemical mixtures on the embryonic development in lobster eggs

Deep-burrowing crustaceans – density dependent effects on sediment chemistry Some thalassinidian crustaceans burrow exceptionally deep into the anoxic part of marine sediment where molecular diffusion normally dominates chemical transport. In this study we use tracers and microsensors to monitor the impact of such deep bioturbation. By introducing oxygen as well as advective transport to the buried material a large volume of the sediment is affected by one single burrow, and as animal density increases overlapping effects on sediment chemistry are inevitable. The relationship between burrow density and chemical impact are thus studied and modeled. Combined effect of sediment-associated compounds on marine benthic macrofauna This project investigates sub-lethal effects of complex chemical mixtures in both pristine and contaminated marine sediments. Bioturbated sediment comprises a spatially and temporally dynamic mosaic of redox reactions. By using voltammetric microelectrodes that concurrently measure, in situ, a suite of compounds involved in early diagenesis it is possible to obtain the resolution needed to study such complex and dynamic systems. The combined effects of sediment-associated compounds are primarily studied on two marine mud-shrimps, Calocaris macandreae and Upogebia deltaura. The animals’ behavioral and toxicological responses to dynamic solute matrices and associated (scavenged) anthropogenic heavy metals are studied in boxcore (microcosm) experiments. Particular attention is given to quantifying concentration-response relationships and thresholds, and in identifying physiological mechanisms, with respect to ecologically relevant chemical mixtures. Effects of chemical mixtures on the embryonic development in lobster eggs Here we look at the combined effect of diagenetically generated solutes on the embryos of two decapod lobster species, Homarus gammarus and Nephrops norvegicus. Chemical dynamics in and around egg clutches are studied in detail, using microsensor-technology. Physiological and morphological parameters are monitored to estimate effects on development in embryos exposed to chemical mixtures both in vivo and in vitro. Adult female behavioral response, genetic and ecological differences are also investigated.

Biology Sediments
139. Structure and function of shallow marine coastal communities

Shallow coastal areas on the Swedish west coast are generally considered highly productive and important nursery grounds for both invertebrates and fish. Several commercial important coastal fish species utilize the abundant food resources in the shallow bays during their juvenile life history stages. In my research, trophic relationships are characterized among a guild of epibenthic fish and crustaceans in some shallow embayments along the Swedish west coast. I focus principally on the influence of physical factors (temperature, salinity, exposure, sediment type, oxygen level and habitat structure) on predator-prey dynamics which are quantified in a multi-level approach involving laboratory experiments and field sampling. My intention is to study biotic regulation of populations within the limits set by naturally occurring abiotic factors in coastal areas. The general hypothesis is that habitat structure (sediment and vegetation) in a coastal area has a decisive importance for community structure and function. The structure of the habitat influence the carrying capacity of the area and set the limits within which population size may fluctuate. Population dynamic, production and consumption of epibenthic fauna and fish has been estimated quantitatively in some shallow soft bottom bays, and energy flow models have been constructed for both a sandy habitat and an eelgrass bed. Interactions between habitat structure (sediment and vegetation) and the structure of epibenthic fauna has been evaluated in several types on coastal environments in the Skagerrak and the Kattegat. For example, changes in macrovegetation in shallow coastal areas and its effects on recruitment and population structure of associated crustaceans and fish has been investigated. Distribution of filamentous algae has been assessed by aerial photo documentation, and interactions between vegetation and fauna has been studied in laboratory experiments and field investigations. Structure of fish assemblages has been related to vegetation type in both rocky and soft bottom communities. In shallow sandy bays recruitment mechanisms in flatfish has been studied. Further, the structuring role of hypoxia on demersal fish communities has been investigated in SE Kattegat and York River, Chesapeake Bay, including studies of species structure, biomass, growth, migrations and food selection.

Biology Ecosystems
140. Genetic identification of populations in Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba) and Northern Shrimp (Pandalus borealis)

Stock assessment of marine Crustecea suffers from uncertainties in estimation of size and yield due to difficulties in identifying population entities. This project will use molecular methods to investigate weather Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba) in the Southern Ocean and northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis/ P. eous) in the north Atlantic and north Pacific should be viewed as large panmictic populations or if they ought to be subdivided in sub-populations on genetic grounds. Yearly landings of northern shrimp reach ˜ 250 000 metric tonnes, and ˜ 100 000 metric tonnes of Antarctic Krill are landed per year. In January 2000 I collected krill samples from 12 stations in an area from east of S. Georgia via the S. Orkney Islands to SW of the S. Shetland Islands. Samples of P.borealis from west Greenland, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Gulf of Maine, Icelandic waters, the Barents Sea, the Norwegian coast and the North Sea and Skagerrak in the Atlantic have been obtained or are being obtained. For comparisons I will also get samples from the coast of Alaska and the Berings Sea. In addition to extracting amplifying and sequencing DNA from the 16 S gene and COI gene we (co-operation with Dr. P. Sundberg, Mrs S. Viker and Mrs. A Hjelmgren, Zoology Dept. Göteborg University) will attempt to design primers for more fast-evolving genes, which we assume will be better suited for our analyses. In order to design primers that covers these sections we will endeavour to sequence the entire mitochondrial genome for the model species. Results will be analysed in co-operation with Dr. Ziad Thaib, Applied Mathematics Chalmers School of Technology and Göteborg University.

Biology