ENVINET Activities Catalog

ENVINET Activities Catalog

ENVINET (European network for arctic-alpine multidiciplanary environmental research) is a research infrastructure network focusing on multidisciplinary environmental research in Europe. The network involves representatives from 18 environmental research infrastructures from the European Alps to the Arctic, representatives of their users and representatives from relevant international organizations and networks. The participating infrastructures cover a broad range of environmental sciences primarily within atmospheric physics and chemistry as well as marine and terrestrial biology.

The ENVINET project directory covers data and observation activities at these stations.

Other catalogs through this service are AMAP, SAON and SEARCH, or refer to the full list of projects/activities.

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Displaying: 1 - 6 of 6
1. Radioactivity in air monitoring at the high altitude Sonnblick Observatory

As part of the Austrian radioactivity monitoring network an air sampler and a high resolution radioactivity detection system is installed at the high altitude Sonnblick Observatory (3105 m). The objective is to monitor the radioactivity in air at high altitudes.

Radioactivity Contaminant transport Radionuclides Emissions Exposure Atmosphere
2. Pallas-Sodankylä, GAW station, Northern Finland

GAW serves as an early warning system to detect further changes in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and changes in the ozone layer, and in the long-range transport of pollutants, including acidity and toxicity of rain as well as the atmospheric burden of aerosols.

Atmospheric processes Ozone Arctic haze UV radiation Radioactivity Climate variability Long-range transport Climate Acidification Contaminant transport Climate change Radionuclides Arctic Atmosphere Temporal trends
3. Tritium as a 'natural' tracer of air masses

It is well known that tritium, the hydrogen isotope 3H, is part of nuclear weapons and was spread all over the world as a consequence of nuclear bomb explosions. Rarely it is regarded as being “natural”, but actually it is. Long time before humans appeared tritium already existed on earth for a long time. This “natural” tritium is the product of cosmic radiation interactions with the atmosphere (mainly N-14). Nowadays this kind of tritium production contributes only to a small extent to the atmospheric tritium. Tritium is radioactive and decays with a half-life of 4.500 days under the emission of a very low energetic beta-particle. In the atmosphere tritium can be found within water vapour (HTO), hydrogen (HT) or methane (CH3T). Yet, the main portion of tritium released during the 1960’s has already been eliminated from the atmosphere by radioactive decay and precipitation. A large amount is captured in the oceans. Indeed, today anthropogenic sources releasing tritium to the environment can still be found. At the end of the 1980‘s contacts with research institutes in former Eastern Bloc countries lead to the idea of establishing a tritium sampling network. The primary goal was the documentation of atmospheric tritium. Statements about potential releases and their sources and the radiation hazards associated should be obtained. Furthermore it might help with the verification of meteorological models. To acquire comparable results a standardised sampling device was developed. This system simultaneously collects samples of air humidity and hydrogen. It was planned to enlist the gathered data in a database and to use them for the following subjects: • observation of local and global tritium transport in the atmosphere • detecting tritium releases and locating their sources • radiation risk evaluation • examining the transmutation of elemental hydrogen into water under natural conditions With the breakdown of the Eastern Bloc the idea of this common network faded away. At the moment only at two stations in Austria air humidity and air hydrogen are collected as planned: since 1991 at Research Center Arsenal in Vienna and since 1999 at Hoher Sonnblick a high mountain station (3160 m). Currently we are working together with the IAEA on a project with the aim to find a model, which helps evaluating weather conditions and in particular the climatic processes. As for these investigations the stable isotopes H-2 and O-18 are used and the currently used device introduces fractionation a new method is developed right now. Since the specific tritium activity concentration is not affected by air pressure or humidity the values for the two locations can be compared directly. In general the measured values are similar but sometimes differ noticeably. For example a peak value for the tritium activity concentration observed during March 2000 at Sonnblick was not noticed in Vienna. In this context the attempt should be made to analyse the air flows with the help of trajectories. The tritium activity concentration of air humidity is primarily determined by the amount of humidity itself. Therefore the concentration is directly linked to the seasons. Only significant changes in the specific tritium activity concentration can be detected by the use of the tritium activity concentration. Seasonal variations within the tritium activity concentration of hydrogen could not be observed. The values vary around 10 mBq/m3.

Atmospheric processes Radioactivity Long-range transport Climate Contaminant transport Radionuclides Modelling Atmosphere
4. Determination of atmospheric fluxes of Radionuclides, Heavy Metals and Persistent Organic pollutants in well defined watershed, lakes and coastal marine sediments of Svalbard from the beginning of nuclear age

The 2003 field activity will be mainly dedicated to coring activity which includes: 1. the sampling of snow and ice cores from a Ny-Ålesund nearby glacier (midre Lovenbreen). 2. the collection of near coast (Kongsfjorden) and lakes sediments (maximum under pack depth 30 m). Sampling collection of ice and sediment cores will be performed using a portable, electric operated, sampling corer. The transport of all materials up to each sampling station should be performed with snowcats.

Atmospheric processes Biology Hydrography Heavy metals Radioactivity Radionuclides Arctic Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) Sediments Atmosphere Ecosystems
5. Determination of cloud coverage and radiative forcing from surface measurements

Specific objectives of the proposal are: 1. the determination of the cloud coverage by means of a simple methodology based on radiometric measurements; 2. the determination of the radiative forcing produced by different type of cloud and coverage for applications into GCM’s as ‘cloud parameterisations’. The results will be obtained for two different radiative regimes by means of different experimental campaigns.

effects on surfaces energy fluxes measurement of the radiative surface partition Radioactivity cloud coverage Exposure solar radiation radiative forcing Atmosphere
6. Mobilisation and Consentration of Natural and Anthropogenic nuclides in a high Arctic Fjord

This year the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority hope to conduct marine biota, water and terrestrial sampling in the area of Kongsfjord. Such samples as are obtained will be analysed for a suite of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, the resulting data contributing towards NRPA’s marine and terrestrial monitoring program and research efforts in the area of Arctic radioecology. These research efforts are currently focused on two areas: Arctcic marine radioecology and Arctic terrestrial radioecology. The marine component of this years field work will provide samples allowing for the study of variability in the uptake of radioactive marine contamination in a High Arctic fjord. Samples will also be taken, where possible, of such species as constitute prey for seabirds in the area. The terrestrial component shall be concerned with factors pertaining to the clarification of the situation regarding elevated levels of radionuclides at certain sites within the Kongsfjord area, most pertinent being those associated with detrital accretions close to bird colonies.

Radioactivity Long-range transport