Sweden: projects/activities

Directory entires that have specified Sweden as the primary or lead country for the project/activity and are included in the AMAP, ENVINET, SAON and SEARCH directories. To see the full list of countries, see the countries list. The specified country may not be the geographic region where the activity is taking place - to select a geographic region, see the list of regions.

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Displaying: 61 - 80 of 228 Next
61. Sweden glacier measurements

Mass balance measurements started at Storglaciären in the Kebnekaise massif in 1946 (Table 5, #2.1). At present, the measurements comprise a mass balance of 5 glaciers in the area. In calculating one year’s mass balance, measurements are taken twice per year (in winter and summer) and mass balances are calculated annually by the Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology at Stockholm University (SU-INK). Measurement of glacier fronts is a simpler alternative to mass balance calculations that could be used as an index for mass balance. Stockholm University (SU-INK) performs such front measurements at 18 glaciers every second year (Table 5, #2.2).

62. IRF ozone and other trace gases monitoring + aerosols + thin clouds + wind/structures + atmospheric composition + particle precipitation + ionosphere

The total column amount of ozone and other trace gases are measured with mm-wave instruments, FT-IR and DOAS spectrometers, at IRF in Kiruna (Table 6, #8.1). With the sun or moon as infrared light sources, FT-IR spectrometers can quantify the total column amounts of many important trace gases in the troposphere and stratosphere. At present the following species are retrieved from the Kiruna data: O3 (ozone), ClONO2, HNO3, HCl, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC- 22, NO2, N2O, NO, HF, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CH4, CO, COF2, H2O, HCN, HO2NO2, NH3, N2, and OCS. Together with Russian and Finnish institutes at the same latitude, IRF studies the stratospheric ozone and its dependence on polar atmospheric circulation and precipitation of charged particles. The ground-based instruments are also used to validate satellite measurements of vertical ozone distribution (Odin, SAGE III, and GOME). Aerosols and thin clouds are measured at IRF in Kiruna. For example, researchers use Lidars (Light Detection and Ranging) to measure polar stratospheric and noctilucent clouds. Winds and structures are measured with ESRAD MST radar at IRF in Kiruna. At IRF in Kiruna measurements are used to assess the physical and chemical state of the stratosphere and upper troposphere and the impact of changes on the global climate. Particle precipitation is measured by relative ionospheric opacity meters (riometers) at IRF in Kiruna. Riometers measure the absorption of cosmic noise at 30 and 38 MHz and provide information about particles with energies larger than 10 keV. The electron density of the ionosphere is measured by ionosonds and digisondes at IRF in Kiruna.

Pollution sources Environmental management Atmosphere
63. Sweden magnetic field monitoring

The Earth’s magnetic field is monitored with magnetometers at Fiby (near Uppsala) and at Abisko. The magnetic field fluctuates rapidly depending on solar activity and slowly depending on variations within the mantle of the Earth. The rapid fluctuations are measured every second by a flux-gate magnetometer and the slow fluctuations twice per month by a proton-precession magnetometer (Table 6, #9.2). Data are archived at World Data Center WDC-C1 in Copenhagen, WDC-C2 in Kyoto, and NGDC in Boulder. The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) is responsible for the protonprecession magnetometer measurements.

Geophysics
64. Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) (ALIS)

In and around Kiruna, IRF uses all-sky cameras and other images to detect and record the aurora. The all-sky cameras have 180° field-of-view and take one image per minute. They have been in operation since the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957 (Table 6, #9.1). The Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) is a large-scale array of high-resolution monochrome CCD detectors around Kiruna, a network of seven stations within approximately 50 x 50 km. The International Network for Auroral Optical Studies of the Polar Ionosphere, coordinated by IRF, is a forum for planning measuring campaigns, distributing information, and intercalibrating different sets of instruments located in different parts of the world. The network is part of the IPY-endorsed project Heliosphere Impact on Geospace (IPY Cluster #63), with Interhemispheric Conjugacy Effects in Solar-Terrestrial and Aeronomy Research (ICESTAR) and International Heliophysical Year (IHY) as lead projects.

65. SEPA Ozone monitoring

SMHI measures the thickness of the ozone layer at 2 sites in Sweden, one at Norrköping in southeast Sweden and one at Svartberget Forest Research Park, Vindeln, 70 km NW of Umeå. At Svartberget a Dobson and a Brewer Spectrophotometer are operational. The measurements are part of SEPA’s Environmental Monitoring Program.

Pollution sources Atmosphere
66. SU ITM organic pollutants sampling

Organic environmental pollutants in air and precipitation are assessed by the Department of Applied Environmental Sciences (ITM), Stockholm University in a program with 3 sampling sites in Sweden and northern Finland. The analyses include 31 variables, comprised of 12 PAHs, 7 PCBs, 3 DDTs, 3 chlordanes, 2 HCHs, 1 HCB, and 3 PBDEs (Table 4, #1.7).

Pollution sources
67. IVL Throughfall network

Deposition measurements are mainly made in forest injury observation plots laid out by the Swedish Forestry Agency (SST). The observations made are: Air Chemistry: SO2, NO2, NH3, O3 Soil Water Chemistry: pH, Alk, SO4-S, Cl, NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn, Fe, ooAl, oAl, Al-tot, TOC Deposition open field precipitation: H+, SO4-S, Cl, NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn Deposition in forest throughfall: H+, SO4-S, Cl, NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn A notorious problem in deposition assessments is dry deposition on forest canopies. If throughfall is sampled below the canopy it will consist not only of dry and wet deposition, but also of canopy leakage, i.e. exudates and diffusion of substances from within the leaves. However, it has been argued that throughfall sampling, even if not free from problems, may add information to the normal wet deposition sampling. IVL operates a throughfall sampling network comprised of 10 forest sites for sampling, from which monthly samples are analyzed for pH, SO4, NO3, NH4, Kjeldahl-N, Cl, K, Ca, Na, Mg, TOC, conductivity, alkalinity, and amount of throughfall.

Environmental management Pollution sources
68. SMHI Mesoscale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry Model (MATCH)

Calculating deposition in a grid over Sweden showed the lack of information on deposition at high altitude. SMHI applied the meso scale MATCH model to calculate the deposition field and the matched model is called MATCH-Sweden. The result is found at http://www.smhi.se/cmp/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=5640&l=sv The observations made at these stations are: Particles in air: SO4-S, NO3-N, NH4-N, Cl, Na, Ca, Mg, K Gase:s NH3-N, HNO3-N, SO2-S Deposition open field precipitation: H+, SO4-S, Cl, NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K Deposition in forest throughfall: H+, SO4-S, Cl, NO3-N, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K To integrate the relatively few deposition measurement sites, SMHI has adopted the Mesoscale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry Model (MATCH) that uses emission data, meteorological data, routines for chemical processes, and a transport model to calculate long-range transport and deposition of air pollutants (Table 4, #1.5). Time series of gridded data over Sweden for deposition of different inorganic chemical compounds calculated with the MATCH-Sweden model are available at SMHI (Appendix, Table 11). When the MATCH-Sweden model was first tested, the deposition network lacked high elevation sites. Hence, a monitoring program for deposition at higher elevations (Table 4, #1.9) was started. It consists of 4 sites in high elevation forests along the Swedish mountain ridge, where NO3, NH4, NH3, HNO3, SO2, SO4, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, pH, conductivity, and amount of precipitation are analyzed on monthly accumulated precipitation samples.

Atmosphere Environmental management Pollution sources
69. Sweden EMEP air and precipitation chemistry

The subprogram main task is to check if international agreements as the UN Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLTRAP) are followed. EMEP = European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme. The network comprises 10 stations, out of which three are in northern Sweden. Air chemistry is monitored by diffusion samplers. The following compounds are measured: SO2, SO4, tot-NH4, tot-NO3, soot, NO2, O3 Precipitation quality is monitored by samplers with lid, open only when it rains. The following compounds are measured: SO4-S, NO-N, Cl, NH4-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K, pH, EC. Ozone near ground is analyzed every hour and is part of an European warning system PM10 is particles Metals in air and precipitation is analysed at Bredkälen only. The following elements are analyzed: As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, V, Hg, metyl-Hg.

Atmosphere GIS Pollution sources
70. Air and Precipitation Chemistry Network (PMK)

The PMK Network is part of the national network for deposition measurements. The aim is a longterm monitoring concentration and deposition of different air transported compounds. The aim is also to generate knowledge about longterm variation in the deposition field, and to give background data from low polluted areas for calculation of pollution deposition in more polluted areas. The Air and Precipitation Chemistry Network includes about 25 sites (14 in northern Sweden) where precipitation from open accumulating samplers are collected and analyzed for pH, SO4, NO3, NH4, Cl, Ca, Mg, Na, K, conductivity, and amount of precipitation (Table 4, #1.2). At 3 sites (one in northern Sweden) precipitation is analyzed for heavy metals, mercury, and methyl-mercury (Table 4, #1.3).

Climate Pollution sources Atmosphere
71. Norunda CO2, methane and gas fluxes

At the top of the micrometeorological tower (102 m) at Norunda north of Uppsala, carbon dioxide and methane concentrations are also measured.

Climate Atmosphere
72. IRF Weather station

at the Institute for Space Physics (IRF) in Kiruna, an automated weather station logging air temperature, humidity, wind, pressure, and UV-radiation has been in operation since 1996

Climate Atmosphere
73. Abisko Scientific Research Station (ANS) (ANS)

Investigations within many areas of biosciences and geosciences are carried out at the station. The emphasis of staff research is on plant ecology and meteorology. The main objectives of the ecological projects are to study the dynamics of plant populations and to identify the controlling factors at their latitudinal and altitudinal limits. The meteorological projects deal with recent climate changes in the region, and also with local variations of the microclimate in subalpine and alpine ecosystems.

Atmosphere Climate Ecosystems Environmental management
74. SLU, Faculty of Forestry, Unit for Forest Field Research, experimental forests

The Faculty of Forestry at SLU has two research stations with experimental forests, two experimental forests with permanent staff, three without permanent staff and a large number of long-term field trials. These facilities are spread over the country.

Climate Environmental management Atmosphere Ecosystems
75. SMHI Climate monitoring

The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) performs basic climate measurements (Table 2 and Table 6, #1) in an irregular grid over the country (Fig. 1). For non-commercial research and educational purposes, data from the core services are made available at handling costs only. The meteorological base network (Table 6, ##1.1–1.6) north of 60°N consists of 105 stations; Table 2 lists the different observation programs. In addition to the meteorological base network, SMHI operates several other climate stations with a variety of instrumentation. Main gaps: The meteorological base network was biased toward lowland in populated areas, originally because potential observers were more likely to be found there. This problem has been partly overcome since the introduction of automated sampling systems. Still there has been a need for climate measurements in forested areas on higher grounds. Network type: National monitoring

Atmosphere
76. Ice caves in order to reconstruct Holocene glacier recessions

The objective of the project was the investigation of englacial melt water channels of Svalbard glaciers in order to find in situ organic material within glacier caves. Specified organic material found beneath glaciers was meant for radiocarbon dating and creation of reliable geochronologies of glacier recessions with considerable smaller glacier termini than present on Svalbard. First radiocarbon dating results ever from organic material found under a glacier’s bottom of glacier Longyearbreen will be published this year. The different moss species ranging from Tomentypnum nitens, Sanionia uncinata, Distichium spp., Syntrichia ruralis gave ages between 1900 and 1100 cal yr BP (Humlum et al., 2004).

Glaciers Geology Climate variability Ice caves Radionuclides Ice
77. Interactions between meiofauna and mat-forming microbes at the sediment-water interface - implications for benthic-pelagic coupling in coastal systems

The project investigated small-scale biotic interactions between laminated microbial communities and meiofauna at light-exposed sediment-water boundaries of estuarine lagoons. The production and biological structure of these systems is mainly determined by complex processes at the sediment-water interface which depend on finely scaled patterns, requiring appreciation of how the biota interact within these scales. We tested whether changing light conditions and active emergence of the harpacticoid species Mesochra lilljeborgi and Tachidius discipes are mediated by the activity of benthic oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophic microbes. Two hypotheses were tested which addresses to the question of causality between changing light conditions and active emergence of the harpacticoid copepods. (1)The harpacticoid copepods T. discipes and M. lilljeborgi will enter the bottom water during daylight when oxygenic photosynthesis of cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae is blocked and conditions at the sediment-water interface have turned anoxic. (2)Both species will not emerge during dark exposures when transferred to sterilized sediments.

Biological effects Biology copepod microbial communities interactions Sediments Ecosystems
78. Life cycle strategies linked to adult development and reproduction in the Northern krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica. Study of the Gullmarsfjorden population.

To recognize some life cycle strategies linked to adult development and reproduction in the Northern krill, Meganyctiphanes norvegica, in the Gullmarsfjorden population. Sampling of krill and analyses of the distribution of sex, body-size, moult and reproductive development stages.

Biology Meganyctiphanes norvegica krill life cycle
79. Interactions between appendicularian and copepod grazing on dinoflagellate blooms

To be completed.

Biology copepod grazing dinoflagellate blooms Food webs Diet
80. Proximate ecological controls on the swimming behaviour of coastal euphausiids

To examine the way in which light intensity and spectrum affects the swimming behaviour and activity of the pelagic euphausiid Meganyctiphanes norvegica. Our initial objective was to develop a method with this animal where clear behavioural responses could be related to various stimuli. By tethering the animals it was hoped that it would be possible to look at the responses of Meganyctiphanes norvegica to subtle changes in light intensity, of the range they might be expected to experience in their natural habitat. Concomitant with the main objective, animals were sampled over 24 hours to look for the presence of clock proteins and examine the movements of visual pigments. To relate any pigment migration to changes in light intensity that the animals might have experienced in situ, animals were also exposed to known quanta of light and then fixed.

Biology euphausiids swimming behaviour Meganyctiphanes norvegica light intensity pigment